THE PUMA​

The puma is the largest feline that we can find in Chile, and after the jaguar, it is the second largest in America. Its extensive distribution, which spans a total of 28 countries, from the cold forests of northern Canada to the extensive pampas of Patagonia, in the Strait of Magellan, make it the most widely distributed land mammal in the world. Forests, coasts, deserts, mountains and prairies are just a few of the many ecosystems in which this resilient animal has managed to survive. Its large size (it can weigh more than 100 kilos), incredible strength and agility make it an efficient hunter, being able to feed on prey that is even double or triple in size.

Even though during their adult life Pumas are mostly solitary animals, it is possible to observe some interactions associated with feeding events, in addition to territorial disputes and courtship during reproductive times. In Pumas, it is the female who is in charge of the hard task of raising the cubs, which can be between 1 and 4 at a time, and that after being fed and taught by their mother, they achieve independence on average when they are between one year and one year and a half old.

Regarding its conservation status, the Puma is classified as "Low Concern" both by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) and by the Species Classification Regulation (RCE) of the Ministry of the Environment in Chile.

The word Puma comes from Quechua (a native South American language family spoken primarily in the Andes, derived from a common ancestral language) which means "powerful animal", being a feline revered in various cultures throughout its entire distribution. Despite the above, life has not been easy for this majestic feline. This feline has been hunted and hunted for over a century, due to the conflict with livestock. This has led to dozens of Pumas being hunted in retaliation for the loss of livestock, decimating their population in various parts of both Chile and the world, this being one of the main threats to their conservation. In Patagonia, the situation has not been different, and there are still several dozen Pumas that continue to be hunted both legally and illegally for their interaction with livestock.

At Estancia Cerro Guido we are working to find a solution to this conflict through an innovative program that will seek to maintain traditional Patagonian livestock in harmony with the local Puma populations. To achieve this, methodologies will be implemented to reduce the damage caused by Puma to domestic livestock, such as the use of protective dogs for livestock, dissuasive and changes in the type of livestock management. In parallel, constant monitoring will be maintained and scientific studies will be developed which can contribute to the knowledge of the species in South America and the region, in addition to the implementation of a conservation tourism initiative, which allows visitors to live the experience of the work carried out within the ranch and at the same time, contribute directly to the protection of the species in Patagonia.

In the long term, we hope to generate a change in the local perception towards the Puma and thus achieve a harmonious coexistence between livestock, the Puma and local biodiversity.

IDENTIFIED PUMAS

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PUMAS

PUMAS IDENTIFICATION CHARTS

Our constant presence in the field has allowed us to register and identify a significant number of pumas that pass through or have made Cerro Guido their home. Each Puma has its own distinctive characteristics and behaviour, which allows us to later identify them individually. To help with a more precise recognition of the Pumas in the ranch, we created identification cards; in which we record the characteristic features of each Puma that we have managed to differentiate individually: sex, age, colouration, marks on their body, wounds and behaviour, in addition to the sector or sectors where it has been sighted.

These files are constantly being reviewed and updated, in order to have an up to date catalogue of the pumas in Cerro Guido.

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C O L L A R

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Foto: Naun Amable

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C O L L A R C I T A

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Foto: Alfredo Rivera

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D A R K

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Foto: Guy Wenborne

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B A B A R

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Foto: Alfredo Rivera

Foto: Alfredo Rivera

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B A S T Ó N

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Foto: Mirko Utrovicich

Foto: Mirko Utrovicich

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B I G O

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Foto: Alfredo Rivera

Foto: Alfredo Rivera

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C L A R O

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Foto: Nicolaás Lagos

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D O S  D E  O R O

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Foto: Nicolás Lagos

Foto: Nicolás Lagos

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R A Y A

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Foto: Pía Vergara

Foto: Pía Vergara

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L I N D A

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Foto: Alfredo Rivera

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S O L O

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Foto: Pía Vergara

Foto: Pía Vergara

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T R I S T O N A

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Foto: Pía Vergara

Foto: Pía Vergara

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P I N T O

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Foto: Alfredo Rivera